Yoko Ono: “I Had Nothing To Do With Breaking Up The Beatles”

Yoko Ono: “I Had Nothing To Do With Breaking Up The Beatles”

It was a time of deep loss, psychological questioning and bitter in-fighting over leadership and business that would ultimately end in the band’s split. 

Companies need to be aware not to become the Beatles with low performers playing the role of Yoko Ono’s in your high-performance teams.  

From a better salary to a sense of purpose, there are many reasons why top performers leave for other opportunities. 

A recent management survey reports that: 

  • 68% say low performers lower overall workplace morale 
  • 44% say low performers increase the work burden on high performers 
  • 54% say low performers contribute to a lack of initiative and motivation, resulting in a work culture where mediocrity is accepted 

Before Examiz developed MATCH, it has been nearly impossible to identify low-performing job candidates before offering them a job. (www.examiz.com)

Based on the data results, companies may need to adjust their hiring processes accordingly. The cost of attrition is high, especially when it’s your high-performers who are leaving. 

“Companies that do not address low-performance issues will likely weaken their culture and drive away their best people.” said Melissa Jezior, CEO of Eagle Hill

In Beatles lore, no person is as divisive or controversial as Yoko Ono, the lover and eventual bride of John Lennon, who arrived on the scene as the band was facing its toughest hardships. 

Yoko Ono: “I Had Nothing To Do With Breaking Up The Beatles”

Yoko Ono: “I Had Nothing To Do With Breaking Up The Beatles”

It was a time of deep loss, psychological questioning and bitter in-fighting over leadership and business that would ultimately end in the band’s split. 

Companies need to be aware not to become the Beatles with low performers playing the role of Yoko Ono’s in your high-performance teams.  

From a better salary to a sense of purpose, there are many reasons why top performers leave for other opportunities. 

A recent management survey reports that: 

  • 68% say low performers lower overall workplace morale 
  • 44% say low performers increase the work burden on high performers 
  • 54% say low performers contribute to a lack of initiative and motivation, resulting in a work culture where mediocrity is accepted 

Before Examiz developed MATCH, it has been nearly impossible to identify low-performing job candidates before offering them a job. (www.examiz.com)

Based on the data results, companies may need to adjust their hiring processes accordingly. The cost of attrition is high, especially when it’s your high-performers who are leaving. 

“Companies that do not address low-performance issues will likely weaken their culture and drive away their best people.” said Melissa Jezior, CEO of Eagle Hill

In Beatles lore, no person is as divisive or controversial as Yoko Ono, the lover and eventual bride of John Lennon, who arrived on the scene as the band was facing its toughest hardships. 

Talents: Think differently or lose the battle

Talents: Think differently or lose the battle

How can organizations better prepare for what’s coming?

Organizations should embrace a more expansive and dynamic view of their talent supply—one that tosses out the usual preoccupation with titles and traditional roles and looks instead at the underlying skills people have. Indeed, we find that when companies start with skills—the ones they need, the ones they have, and how the mix may change over time—they can free up their thinking and find more creative ways to meet the inevitable mismatches.

In the book Leading Organizations, McKinsey senior partners Scott Keller and Mary Meaney address the most basic issues facing leaders: attracting and retaining talent, developing the talent you have, managing performance, creating leadership teams, making decisions, reorganizing to capture value quickly, reducing overhead costs for the long term, making culture a competitive advantage, leading transformational change, and transitioning to new leadership roles.


Why is talent important?

Management guru Jim Collins concurred: “… the single biggest constraint on the success of my organization is the ability to get and to hang on to enough of the right people.”
The late Steve Jobs of Apple summed up talent’s importance with this advice: “Go after the cream of the cream. A small team of A+ players can run circles around a giant team of B and C players.”
A recent study, called “THE BEST AND THE REST: REVISITING THE NORM OF NORMALITY OF INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE” conducted by Ernest O’Boyel Jr. and Herman Aguinis found that 10% of productivity comes from the top 1% of employees and 26% of output is a product of the top 5%.

How to match talents with value to let the top 5% generate the highest value for the organization? Apple started with identifying the top five percent of their employees. With Apple’s share price having steadily risen since then, it appears that Steve Jobs was right. Successful companies recognize that getting the right talent in the right place can make or break their overall performance.
Once the 5 percent of roles that create 95 percent of the value are identified, the question becomes whether your most talented people are in these roles. We rarely find that the best leaders in the company are methodically deployed as such. Further, keeping the right talent in these roles typically requires significant adjustments to job design (removing administrative burdens), career paths (rapid advancement opportunities and special projects), compensation (above market), location (high flexibility), development (high touch beyond formal programs and the formal performance management process), leadership exposure and influence (more, sooner) and the like.

Citations from McKinsey Business Insights | 2017 – 2020


Great talent is scarce

The competition for top talent is only going to intensify in coming decades. Employers in North America and Europe will require more than 11 percent more college-educated workers than will be available in 2020, according to a recent study by the McKinsey Global Institute. Developing economies will face a shortfall of 45 million workers with a secondary-school education and vocational training.


Work Engagement and Impact on Work Performance

Work Engagement and Impact on Work Performance

Organizations are always looking for ways to improve employee productivity, and they can learn from high-performing companies. Companies like Google, Apple and Netflix are 40% more productive than the average company by using a mix of employee performance management strategies that focus on organizational structure and trust-building.

David Mizne from 15five Blog stated that according to research by Bain & Company, the way companies construct their teams has a significant impact on productivity. Apple and Google for example, dedicate 95% of their top talent to key business functions, as opposed to spreading top talent across many areas.

Without talented and dedicated people, a business is little more than a great idea. While this seems obvious, companies didn’t always focus on employee performance management to stimulate growth and satisfaction as they do now. Developments in this area over the last few years have brought this truism home like never before.

What Is Work Performance?

Work performance is an evaluation of employees based on how well they are executing their expected work. It includes an individual’s performance with respect to documented responsibilities, goals, and reasonable expectations with other associates of the company. Work performance of an employee is directly influenced by his work engagement.

So, How Do We Define Work Engagement?

It’s a positive, fulfilling work-related state of mind which is categorised by vigor, dedication and absorption. It is very recent that scholar across the globe has shifted from negative aspects of working life to the positive aspects. The well-being of an individual is not a responsibility of their employers but also of that individual himself. A mentally, emotionally and physically heathy employee can not only increase his productivity but also his own performance. Work performance is optimal when an employee is in a healthy- motivational state of mind.

Is Work Engagement And Work Performance Related?

Yes, the more the employees are engaged with their work the more is their productivity. Demerouti & Cropanzano (2010) explains that work engagement is beneficial for both employees and organization because an employee with high level of energy and enthusiasm, fully concerned and happily engrossed in his work can easily increase his work performance. This person exudes positive emotions such as happiness, joy and enthusiasm and helps building a positive work culture around him.

There is a direct and positive correlation between happiness and performance. Happiness can be measured through work satisfaction and well-being. Examiz TEAMS evaluates what teams actually think, what concerns them and what holds them back to become high-performance teams. Job satisfaction is considered as an evaluation of the experienced job and motivational; whereas, well-being is considered as a motivational state of mind. A combination of both, well-being and satisfaction, is a measure of work engagement.

Further, as per the well-established Broaden and Build Theory by Fredrickson (2001), “Positive emotions share the capacity to broaden people’s momentary thought- actions repertoires and build their personal resource”. Personal resources are the physical, intellectual, social and psychological resources that widen the array of thought and actions of an individual.  Action repertoires are the behavioural repertoire that builds skills and resources. Personal resources and simultaneous action help an individual to cultivate positive emotions.

How Does Work Engagement Impacts Work Performance?

If the manager of the company has high anxiety level, this could easily pervade in the work culture, which leads to fight or flight response. However, if a manager is determined, enthusiastic and focuses on his well-being and that of other employees, the work environment is healthy one to work in. Engaged workers are more likely to fulfill their jobs and also accomplish the diverse range of work tasks and responsibilities, that they are required to fulfill.

What A Company Should Do To Ensure Work Engagement?

CEO of Campbell’s Soups rightly states, “To win in the marketplace you must first win in the workplace”.

The company’s top priority other than to earn high returns is to keep people engaged with them happy. A company should endeavor to focus more on work engagement rather than just getting the work done. They should find ways to motivate the employees and enhance their well-being. Only when an employee is happily engrossed in his work, is enthusiastic and resilient towards his work he can perform the task in hand in the best possible way. Employees around the globe feel happy when the companies pay them fairly, provide them with safe working conditions and good benefits. In addition, developing a positive work culture in an organization where the employees feel recognized and appreciated, helps maximize an individual’s personal capabilities and ensures the overall growth of the company and the individual himself. With such benefits that an employee earns, he will not only complete the task in hand in stipulated time but will also be willing to share responsibilities with others and help this around him to become better.

People Analytics tools like Examiz TEAMS helps organizations to map the personality-driven DNA for their high-performance teams and enables organizations to form their teams be be the best-performing in the respective industry or market.

Three types of aggression and how to detect them.

Three types of aggression and how to detect them.

Interviewer: Do you easily get agitated?
Candidate: No, not at all.

Interviewer: What would you do, if you do not agree with your teammate’s idea on a certain assignment.
Candidate: I would listen to his ideas and then try to convince him but if he does not get convinced then I’ll go with the majority of the team.

Interviewer: If there happens to be an argument between you and your team head, what would you do then?
Candidate: Firstly, I will try my best not to get into an argument and secondly, if the situation still arises, I will try to be as humble as I can and try to control the situation calmly but I wouldn’t just submit to him just because he’s my team head.

Sounds all reasonable and smooth.. textbook answers, right? But ask yourself this, are these questions helpful to detect how aggressive an individual is? Is the candidate really being honest here? Do we even know what workplace aggression is?

Donovan, Dwight and Hurts (2003) reported that 15% individuals fake their personal identity while 62% of them fake when it comes to answering questions on negative behaviour and aggression is a type of negative behaviour. According to Snell, Sydell & Luke (1999), an individual who can fake a self-report test must have both, the ability to fake and the motivation to do so. An individual in a traditional measure can easily fake their responses due to the direct nature of these questions, as they wouldn’t want to come across as an aggressive individual. A dishonest person will always be motivated to do so.

It is very recent in times that workplace aggression has become the epicentre of research in various organizations. Psychologists have defined workplace aggression as an act of threat or physical assault causing physical or emotional harm at work setting. They have further divided into three forms: Reactive, Hostile and Appetitive aggression.

If an employee constantly makes derogatory remarks, humiliates others or diminishes self-esteem of their colleagues, an organisation must be watchful of such employees. This particular kind of aggression is not planned, hence the intent here is not to cause any harm but to establish dominance. It is caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic emotions of that individual. Psychologists determine this kind of aggression as Reactive- Expressive Aggression or simply reactive aggression. A reactive aggressive individual generally humiliates others, makes derogatory remarks and increases apprehension and stress among others

But sometimes, an individual’s main goal is to harm others and it may or may not be visible in his/her actions. The emotion that individual experiences is anger and he wishes to see other people suffer. An employee with this kind of aggression will constantly get into arguments which can easily manifest itself into a violent confrontation. This kind of individual will keep the environment tensed as everyone around would be very cautious as they wouldn’t want to harm themselves. This kind of aggression is called Reactive and Inexpressive aggression or Hostile aggression.

Furthermore, there are individuals who are highly competitive. The intention of these individuals is to win and they can do anything to complete a given task. These individuals generally do not experience anger but due to their competitive nature, they can harm anyone who comes in their way. This kind of aggression is called Proactive-Relational aggression or Appetitive aggression because these individuals would like to have a competitive advantage over others and this behaviour often breaks human relations.

So, simply by framing questions like, “Do you have a bad temper? Do you show resistance to arguments? Do you show displeasure or discomfort in a particular situation?”, are not enough to check an individual’s aggression. Also, a person may answer these questions in a way that shows that he is less aggressive but there is a possibility that an individual can easily fake such a test.

Psychologists have worked hard to find the right ways to detect aggression in an individual. As a recent development, faking scales have been constructed to measure the aggression in an individual. Examiz uses for instance “Self-Deception technique”, in which the questions are framed in a manner that the individual himself cannot recognize his incorrect perceptions and believes that the options he chooses are the only correct answers, which is generally due to the inflated sense of the individual. Another such way to detect this is Impression Management. In this kind of method, the questions are framed in a way that a person repeatedly chooses options which makes him look good and tries to create an impression, which is often fake.

Aggressive behaviour in any form is harmful to any organization or a company. It puts all the employees at risk, decreases the trust and hinders their productivity. An organization must be cautious enough not to hire individuals who depict these traits and even if they hire such individuals, they should be able to detect the carriers of this aggression so that they can be managed accordingly.

Consider the cost of hiring the wrong person. According to Christine Porath, author of “The Cost of Bad Behavior,” incivility in the workplace can significantly damage the company’s bottom line. Incivility is described in both passive and aggressive behaviors, like taking credit for someone else’s work or spreading rumors about a colleague. According to Porath’s study of Cisco Systems, if 1% of employees experience any form of incivility in the workplace, it would cost the company up to $12 million a year.

Examiz detects patterns of unwanted behavior very early in the recruitment process and helps you to avoid the “bad apples” and protects you from bad hires.